Mark Shapcott was just three months old when his family moved into the Agnes Hunt Village in December 1955. Mark now lives in his Morda and his sister Sandra lives in Wrexham. He shares his fond memories of growing up in Number 16.

The Royal British Legion helped to secure a bungalow in the Agnes Hunt Village for my father who had suffered spinal injury while serving in the Royal Artillery and underwent several operations and long periods of treatment in the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic hospital.

I was just three months old and my sister Sandra was two when we moved into number 16 with our parents Elsie and Eric Shapcott in December 1955.

I have many fond memories and feel privileged to have had such an happy childhood growing up in the company of a great bunch of children and quality families. There were some severely disabled people but they always seemed happy and positive. It was mainly lads in the Derwen in those days with the exception of a few older ladies who had spent most of their lives there; we knew them all, they were friendly and helpful. I remember them wheeling my bike off to the metal shop for repair after I had fallen off. I was very young at the time .

Many of the buildings in the Derwen were of wooden construction back then and a lady named Cath served in the shop where we bought our sweets on our way to a carefree afternoon playing in the brook, where later we would become serious anglers fishing for trout. We were all into sport and spent many long summer days playing games on the green in the centre of the bungalows.

My father passed away in 1990 but my mother remained in the bungalow until her death in 2011 having lived there for just over 55 years.